Things to keep in mind during a home inspection

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Want to get into your local real estate market? With prices surging across America, it’s time to get in before they start to spike.

Many choose to do this by looking for an older starter home, but they lack the foresight to be diligent on whether the owner has been keeping up with maintenance.

They don’t know what to watch out for when strolling around a property they are considering; before you know it, they buy a house which has tens of thousands of dollars worth of defects.

Lloyd Claycomb shakes his head when he hears these stories. As a leader in the Denver area construction industry for more than a generation, he knows what a sturdy home looks like.

When he buys properties to fix up, there is a long checklist he follows to be sure he isn’t throwing wads of his own cash into a flaming pit.

Below, we’ll share what goes through the head of a seasoned home buyer when they are inspecting a property.

There are crucial areas you’ll need to check, so be sure to pay attention to the following points.

1) Look for signs of water leakage

One of the biggest problems you’ll find during a home inspection involves past or present water leaks.

Often taking on the appearance of rusty brown splotches, these signs of spilled water from breached pipes or from a compromised roof may be the first sign of more serious structural damage.

As this compromises the stability of your home, the costs to fix this damage can be expensive depending on the extent of the leaks. If there are signs of these leaks everywhere, you may want to move on to another property.

2) Search for mold

Weakened walls aren’t the only problem water can cause in a home. Its presence or persistent dampness can create the ideal environment for mold.

This fungi is known for the toxic effects it can have on people exposed to this pathogen over many weeks and months.

If the problem is small, you might be able to tackle it on your own, but if it is extensive, the services of an environmental remediation company may be required, which is an expense that will add to your final bill substantially.

3) Inspect the roof

Next, get a ladder so you can assess the roof’s condition. Check the supports to see if they are straight and assess whether the shingles have aged to the point where they have begun to peel or warp.

Either of these problems mean water could find its way into the house if it hasn’t already, causing the issues described earlier in this article.

Next, see if the gutters properly channel water away from the foundation. If it flows toward the property when it rains, your basement could flood in record time during the next torrential downpour.

Use a bucket to put this system to the test. If the present gutters fail, you may have to shift the terminus location of the outlet pipes, or re-grade the land around the property to improve drainage.

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