Drug Violations

The ability of the modern world to keep lots of statistics leads to research that was not easily possible in the past.  One statistic that is always followed is crime.  However, with modern data, many interesting facts about felonies are possible to investigate.  A limited review of the data shows the most common felonies involve burglary, drug violations and theft.

States With the Most Felonies

The state that has the most people guilty of felonies is Texas.  Texas is the second most populous state in the union, although many parts of it are empty desert.  Next in line is Wisconsin. Wisconsin ranking 20th in population, is second.  Third is North Carolina, 29th in population, followed by Oregon, and Connecticut.

Clearly, felonies are being committed more in states with lower populations.  Texas seems to be a bit of an exception, but like the other top 5 states, all states have in common a shore area and large areas of the state with small numbers of populations.

A writer for Vox, Matthew Iglesias, who writes on politics and crime, figures that the more populated areas such as California and New York have many more police officers per person.  Plus, there are more people around to observe the commission of a crime.

Generational Groups and Felonies

In any case, if you look at felons by generation, Generation Y commits the most felonies.  In second place is Generation X, closely behind Generation Y.  In a few states, Generation X beats out generation Y.  A review of generations starting in the 1950s shows that felonies rapidly increased for both these Generations.  Generation Z has a felony rate that has fallen substantially from Generation Y.  In fact, Generation X and Y are responsible for the commission of 70% of all felonies.  The next group, Generation Z, shows a large reduction in felonies.  Perhaps this is due to changes in drug laws.

Felonies and Age Groups

Felonies occur in all age groups.  As one might expect, they decrease with advancing age.   Which ages are most likely to commit felonies?  It turns out that age 20 is a bad year for felonies.  They peak at age 20 and decline thereafter.  Persons of 19 years of age commit nearly as many felonies as 20 year olds.  After age 20, felonies maintain their decline through all age groups.

To find out more about generational felony statistics  visit a company that collects data on crimes.  Using this data, one can find out even more about the effects of generational crime.

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